Jerome Branche

Colonialism and Race in Luso-Hispanic Literature (Columbia: U of Missouri P, 2006):

CHAPTER 5: MUCH OF WHICH IS ABOUT ORTIZ AND HOW HIS WORK SEPARATES BLACK AGENCY FROM THE BLACK REFERENT AND OTHERWISE EMBODIES AND SUPPORTS RACIST INTELLECTUAL PRACTICES.

214: Depestre on negrismo: it showed “neither anger nor rebelliousness.” Branche: “The ability to sucessfully separate the political from the aesthetic is undoubtedly a striking feature of the genre, and could only have been achieved by way of silencing and/or co-optation of the referent, as indicated earlier. The more or less obvious absence or paucitry of black literary voices . . . would therefore offer only a partial explanation of this silence, which . . . has both a material, political dimension, and a symbolic, discursive one.”

214: A depoliticized Afrocubanness is reincorporated to Cuban culture by way of negrista arts … in this way white culture consumes, or cannibalizes Blackness.

230: [In the Revista de Avance/Ecué-Yamba-O] Carpentier used the bongo as an anti-Wall Street symbol. But how does this marginalized cultural artifact suddenly get to occupy a commanding space in the national episteme … and if it does, does its player (a Black man) get to do the same?

243: El Reino de Este Mundo consistently indulges in the “antiblack tropological archive”

CONCLUSION

249: Examples about how literary race making marginalize Blackness are a Negrist discourse in which denigration passes for glorification, and antislavery writing that is less about emancipation than about the celebration of elite abolitionists. Through these texts and their validation as liberating in the critical tradition readers learn to accept an inverted epistemology that sustains racism.

250: The white racial contract interpellates whites across the globe (useful for my purposes: it does not just interpellate Americans). Important source for the misreading of race in L.A. = the racial democracy principle.

Axé.

This entry was posted in Race. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s